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Randy Hall

Steve,

Great thoughts and you are so right about real listening producing clarity that leads to solutions. Thanks for sharing this.

Randy

Steve Roesler

Glad it struck a note, Randy.

GL HOFFMAN

Great post, Steve. I love hiring ex coaches as sales people don't you. Some time back I wrote a post 10 Reasons Why Coaching Little League is Great Management Training.
http://blogs.jobdig.com/wwds/2008/07/18/why-coaching-little-league-is-great-management-training/

keepup the good work,

gl

MIke Rogers

Thanks for the post Steve. I love the statement "The best teachers helped you discover, then celebrate it with you. That's a lot different than telling people to sit still, listen, take notes, memorize, then regurgitate it all on a test."

Great teachers are facilitators, they don't spray at you and the pray you will retain it. They work with you, they care. And most of all they care enough to let you do the discovering. Because it is in the discovering that it will stick. And in the case of manager and employee relationships it is in the discovering that creates buy-in/commitment and a better understanding of how to apply it.

Steve Roesler

GL,

Actually, some of the best role models were coaches I had in Little League; still tell stories about them.

Yeah, why wouldn't a company take advantage of people who have proven they have the ability to be observant, patient, and then helpful? Sounds like a winning formula to me.

Readers: Go to GL's URL for the post.

Steve Roesler

Hi, Mike,

I read your comment three times because something kept jumping out but I couldn't put my finger on it (well, I didn't actually do that at all; it always smears the monitor and I hate when that happens).

You really highlighted the importance of "discovery". Discovery takes time; learning from discovery takes time; which means that "commitment" will take some time.

In a world of sound-bite leadership and the demand for immediate results, it might be a good idea to ponder your comment and ask: "Are we getting lousy/really slow/no results because we don't do the right thing when it comes to genuine commitment?

Thank, Mike.

Wally Bock

Wonderful post, Steve. I think the best teachers and managers help you discover. You covered that will. But they also understand that most human growth is a process of punctuated equilibrium. People don't grow at a steady pace. They don't seem to be doing anything and, then, suddenly, there's an explosion of growth and development. Or, the first learning explodes and then we hit a tough patch. The best bosses understand that process and help explain it to their people.

Steve Roesler

Wally,

You've described yet another problem with the traditional "hockey stick curve" that is the standard expectation of all things business. Your term "punctuated equilibrium" is one that is so sticky and descriptive that it's already imbedded in my mind.

Your point would serve companies well who, with good intentions, put people on a "developmental plan" that has a timeline attached. It's important to recognize the punctuated equilibrium and roller coaster curve that we all take in our development. The phrase "learning is a process, not an event" isn't a cliche. It's truth.

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Calvin

Wonderful post, Steve. I think the best teachers and managers help you discover. You covered that will. But they also understand that most human growth is a process of punctuated equilibrium. People don't grow at a steady pace. They don't seem to be doing anything and, then, suddenly, there's an explosion of growth and development. Or, the first learning explodes and then we hit a tough patch. The best bosses understand that process and help explain it to their people.

Steve Roesler

Calvin

You reminded us of a very important fact about learning. Indeed, it's not a straight-line proposition. Once we become aware of something new, all of us take some period of time simply to decide whether or not we want to learn about it or whether or not it doesn't seem like the time and effort. If we answer in the affirmative, the process is a two-steps forward one step back sort of process. This is why employees benefit from direction, encouragement, feedback and coaching from their boss.

Appreciate you taking time to jump in!

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