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twitter.com/patmcgraw

Steve,

Great post!

My philosophy has always been that my co-workers were selected for their knowledge, experience and personality - that all these things make them a valuable asset to the organization. I work hard on asking them for solutions and then asking them questions about "...what would that mean for us in 6 months or a year?" That way they go beyond fixing today's problems and focus on building for a better tomorrow.

I think today's greatest challenge is that so many organizations are lean and mean - which means opportunities for advancement are limited but opportunities for getting more responsibilities without rewards (beyond continued employment) are more common.

After a while, a new challenge loses some of its luster and other rewards are critical.

Looking forward to comments from others!

Phil Bowermaster

Those are five great questions.

About question 4, what about the issue of whether there is anyplace to move someone who is ready? Just because that individual is ready to move doesn't mean the company has a slot for them.

Kristal Sidener

Steve,

I enjoyed reading your post!

The biggest issue I've noticed with employers is number 5.It is not so much the delegating of others' work when they acknowledge that their employees can take on added responsibility, it is employers who do do not trust enough to delegate their own work to others. I think there is a common stereotype that most managers are great at never doing anything for themselves, but I've found the exact opposite to be true in small businesses. Saying you trust your employees is very different when your personal brand is being placed on their work performance, and a lot of managers trust only to the point of relinquishing the control from between others, and not from themselves.

Thanks for your insight!

http://bit.ly/e2gsCd ~Kristal

Chuck Hebert

Steve,

Thanks for the post. One of the challenges that I've found is that managers will may give a direct report a task to take on, then they proceed to tell them how to do every aspect of that task - not really coaching, as much as dictating. Really like the notion of giving the responsibility and autonomy. That is a important point to truly letting people grow! Thanks again!

Maria Payroll

Great post. Those are good questions to ask one's self and those are very helpful tips. Being a manager is full of challenges and if a person is offered this position, s/he must make sure that s/he would be able to endure this. If you are good to your employees, then your employees would reciprocate the goodness you show them. You must give them tasks that can help them learn more or something new and would add to their skills.

Steve Roesler

Pat,

The "more responsibility without rewards" is, in my travels, reaching epidemic proportions. The results aren't pretty. Although my post is designed to bring out the best in people, that's not going to happen under sweatshop-like conditions. At one client location I discovered that 3 of the 8 managers had had a heart attack in the past year. Each was under the age of 50 and quite athletic.

Quite simply, you can't do more with less. It's a clever catch-phrase that has been adopted as truth. Such pseudo rallying cries sell lots of books and workshops before anyone challenges their validity. It's one thing to operate as efficiently as possible. It's another to kill your employees in the process.

No, I don't have any strong feelings about that.

Tom

Great post

I think it has alot to do with mutual respect. If there is respect between the boss and the worker, goood thinks will happen almost by it self.

Keep up the good posts

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