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peter vajda

Hi Steve, this is wonderful stuff. For me, it underscores two important principles that generate positive, proactive and conscious engagement: (1) What's in it for me? and (2) Make me feel important. In addition, "What do you think?", for me, says, "I care about you" and "I'm interested in what you have to say." All of which, as you say, serve to motivate, enhance self-image, foster curiosity and perhaps even, passion. In one experience, when I managed a group of instructional designers a while back, this is the stuff that got their juices flowing and supported them to see they actually did have value and worth, and others regarded them for their value and worth. . When I was being managed early on, knowing that I would consistently be asked to "contribute" kept me sharp, alert, alive and engaged and feeling appreciated foir my input. Takes a secure, "ego-less" and "servant" type of person, culture, to make it work effectively, sincerely and honestly.

Steve Roesler

Peter,

I am particularly struck by the additional benefit that pops out toward the end of your own experience: "...knowing that I would consistently be asked to "contribute" kept me sharp..."

For those managers with higher control needs, that alone is reason to strongly consider the approach.

Robert Drescher

Hi Steve

I have found that the more discussion you can get from a group of trainees the better they will grasp the concept. In fact it is worth stopping often for discussion during any training session, I like doing it after each key topic. And if possible I like to give them a hands on experience that simulates the topic.

Lack of questions and discussion shows me that there are serious issues that need to be dealt with. If your people are so beaten down they do not question issues, make suggestions or ask for help, you have huge problems with a toxic culture.

If you bore people you put them to sleep, but unfortunately the sleep level they achieve is no where near deep enough for sleep learning. Excitement means you are getting to their heart and soul, only at the point were the topic becomes part of their core will it really take hold.

Even dry regulatory topics can be handled in an exciting fashion, and they should be. With them you can get people discussing the impact of the changes and why they are beneficial.

Steve Roesler

Hello there, Robert,

Thanks for adding helpful and do-able thoughts to the subject. Personally, I always worry when I'm not hearing some buzz about what's being discussed. Some would like to believe that the participants are "totally on board and don't need to ask any questions." I think you'll agree that the situation is usually just the opposite!

Anne Gielczyk

These are some great tips! I believe it's of the utmost importance to engage your audience by connecting in some way. If you have shared experiences, they're more likely to remember you and what you're saying.

Anne Gielczyk

These are some great tips! I believe it's of the utmost importance to engage your audience by connecting in some way. If you have shared experiences, they're more likely to remember you and what you're saying.

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